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August 10, 2022

Change happens slowly. It is often much slower than most of us care for, particularly in recovery. Just as the disease of chemical addiction doesn’t happen overnight, neither does recovery. There are actually 6 stages in the process.

Stage 1: Pre-contemplation:  This is the time for most alcoholics and addicts when they are beginning to experience negative consequences and unmanageability as a result of their using. They are often wanting to minimize consequences, but not yet ready to give up the alcohol or drugs. There is not a great deal of desire to change. Their defenses and rationalizations are in high gear.

Stage 2: Contemplation: In this stage the alcoholic or addict recognizes their using is a problem, but they often waiver on what to do about it. It is common at this stage to procrastinate and put off any real change. Statements such as, “I’ll go to treatment next month,” or “I’ll cut back after the holidays” are the norm. People can stay stuck at this stage for a long time as they try to cut back or attempt controlled drinking or using.

Stage 3: Preparation: This is the point in the change process when most alcoholics or addicts move away from just thinking about the problem and start seriously considering the solution. An alcoholic or addict may still be drinking or using, but now they are making more serious plans for change. They begin taking meaningful steps toward recovery.

Stage 4: Action:  Many people mistakenly believe this is the first step in the change process, because this is when the alcohol or addict begins executing the first steps in their recovery process. It may begin with attending 12 step meetings, going to outpatient treatment, or even entering a residential treatment program. Recovery does not end at this stage. This is just a step in the process.

Stage 5: Maintenance: The focus in this stage of the process is sustaining the changes made in the action stage. It is about recovery behaviors becoming second nature, like going to meetings, calling a sponsor, doing service work. It is also about adopting healthy coping strategies, avoiding triggers and identifying chemical-free ways of having fun.

Stage 6: Termination: In the last stage, people can look in the mirror and confidently say that they are a different and improved person. What makes this stage so important is that recovering alcoholics and addicts are happy with where they are and don’t want to return to their old lifestyle. Even though they may have given up things to be clean, they know their current life is better. Unlike the name suggests, this is not the end of the change process.

It is very important to point out that the stages of change in recovery are fluid. How these stages play out in recovery is highly dependent on the individual. There is no set time limit on when people in recovery progress to the next stage. In reality, recovery is a lifelong process that requires continual evaluation and modification as you progress in your own recovery journey.

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For more information, resources, and encouragement, “like” the Fellowship Hall Facebook page and follow us on Instagram at @FellowshipHallNC.

About Fellowship Hall

For 50 years, Fellowship Hall has been saving lives. We are a 99-bed, private, not-for-profit alcohol and drug treatment center located on 120 tranquil acres in Greensboro, N.C. We provide treatment and evidence-based programs built upon the Twelve-Step model of recovery. We have been accredited by The Joint Commission since 1974 as a specialty hospital and are a member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers. We are committed to providing exceptional, compassionate care to every individual we serve.

July 20, 2022

The words treatment, rehab, addiction, and addict pack a powerful punch – sometimes so powerful we feel as though they are taboo or should not be mentioned.

 

Whether we are the ones seeking treatment, or are family of a loved one needing treatment, the notion of sharing and discussing the topic of addiction is often silenced. Whether due to social taboos, shame or guilt of not being able to help an addict, or the fear of failure and relapse, there are a multitude of reasons one may stay silent either as an addict or as the addict’s support system.

 

Staying Silent – The Addict’s Perspective

As an addict, silence can be one of the reasons we found ourselves on this path to begin with. Silence may be a part of our personality, certainly, but it may also be a coping mechanism that has prevented us from properly expressing and confronting emotions and feelings. We push the feelings down and replace them with substances to extinguish them. Silence compounds the issue, leaving us feeling isolated and alone.

 

Further, silence is detrimental to considering treatment as an option, especially because we have no one to support them. The process of choosing and entering treatment is something to be discussed, shared with others, and evaluated. Silence can cripple us and often keep us from entering a program. Why do we keep quiet when we know we need help? Perhaps we fear we won’t be supported. Perhaps we’ve disappointed so many times we hesitate to even try again. Perhaps we doubt ourselves, and therefore can’t accept anyone else will believe in us.

 

Staying silent can also be detrimental to us in recovery, when it is absolutely crucial to be open and honest. Treatment programs are designed to peel away the layers that have shrouded the addict and drowned us in emotional, social, and sometimes physical scars. By opening up – something very new for those in treatment — and sharing sometimes uncomfortable thoughts and feelings, we receive feedback from our support systems that we can implement outside of the program. This feedback is a crucial building block of recovery.

 

Lastly, silence can be destructive after treatment when we don’t know how to ask for help, even when we realize we need it. The path to recovery can be a lonely one – if we choose – especially if we have become used to not sharing. The complexities of addicted life are ongoing. Leaving treatment does not mean we can again become silent, going back to not sharing our journey, not sharing that we are sober. Being open about where we have been and proud of the work it took to rebuild not only changes us and moves us forward, but can begin to rebuild the relationships that crumbled under the weight of our past choices and behaviors. Support groups and aftercare programs, meetings and sponsors are all in place for a reason – so that we no longer have to live alone in silence.

 

Staying Silent – The Family Perspective

In addition to the addict, silence can harm their families and loved ones. It is common that an entire family will know or at least believe that a family member is addicted to substances of abuse. They will enable, excuse, and cover-up the addictive behaviors, thinking that somehow this approach normalizes the family relationship, or worse – convinces them the addiction is not real.

 

Further complicating the problem of staying silent is the guilt and pain caused when the family does not intervene as they see their loved one take the path of self-destruction. While not all addicts are willing to enter a treatment program, they’re secretly suffering in silence, needing the encouragement and understanding from someone willing to support them in taking that first step.

 

Silence — keeping your privacy and acting as if there’s no problem at all — may seem like an avenue of self-preservation. However, in reality, it can intensify addictive behavior and lead to relapse. Silence does not allow for accountability or responsibility. By opening up and speaking up, allowing others to support you, and asking for help, one begins to break down the walls and continue strong on the road to recovery.

 

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For more information, resources, and encouragement, “like” the Fellowship Hall Facebook page and follow us on Instagram at @FellowshipHallNC.

 

About Fellowship Hall

For 50 years, Fellowship Hall has been saving lives. We are a 99-bed, private, not-for-profit alcohol and drug treatment center located on 120 tranquil acres in Greensboro, N.C. We provide treatment and evidence-based programs built upon the Twelve-Step model of recovery. We have been accredited by The Joint Commission since 1974 as a specialty hospital and are a member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers. We are committed to providing exceptional, compassionate care to every individual we serve.

 

July 6, 2022

Addiction to alcohol and other drugs is a disease that impacts both the substance user as well as their entire family network. When we think of recovery, it can be easy to feel that the process is only applicable or crucial for the suffering alcoholic or addict. However, a critical component of combating the disease is the recovery of the family.

When a loved one is struggling, we may find ourselves in a state of tunnel vision–only focused on the needs, wants and feelings of the one we care about instead of our own. As the disease progresses, the added stress and turmoil continues to build atop our family’s foundation, and if not tended to, our foundation can crumble.

Family recovery begins when we admit and understand that our loved one is powerless over substances and that subsequently, their family life has become unmanageable because of their disease.

As family members, we can gain insight from the 3 C’s of Addiction:

  • You did not Cause the addiction

Nothing you did or didn’t do caused your loved one to become chemically dependent.

  • You can’t Control the addiction

The alcoholic/addict is the only one who can take responsibility for managing their disease.

  • You cannot Cure the addiction

There is no cure for the disease of addiction, only treatment.

Once we understand the 3 C’s, working to improve our own healing can begin.

  • You can take Care of yourself

Make time to do the things that are good for you and that make you feel good. Read a book, go for a walk, journal, make a good meal or soak in the bath. Do things that promote your own personal sense of connectivity, health, and well-being.

  • You can Communicate your feelings

You are allowed to say how you feel. Addiction is a disease that is often associated with feelings of guilt, sadness, anger, frustration, grief and shame for alcoholics, addicts, and their family members. Own your truth and be honest, be direct and specific when sharing your feelings.

  • You can Celebrate who you are

Remind yourself of the things that are special about you, your hobbies, your passions, your goals. Do not lose sight of these aspects of your identity. Addiction can blur many lines in the family system, allowing us to lose sight of where our loved one ends and we as individuals begin. Our identity can become so wrapped up in caring for another individual that we often lose sight of ourselves. By celebrating our individuality, our uniqueness, we are reminded of who we truly are and our purpose outside of the realm of the disease.

Set aside time to heal

Addiction is a war of attrition at times. It can be time consuming and exhausting. Once a family member has agreed to accept treatment, it is easy to feel as though the work is done.

“I’ve already missed so much work/school/social activity and am so behind in life because of this disease I don’t have the time to try and heal myself!” You deserve to heal. You deserve to guiltlessly prioritize yourself and work through the trauma that addiction can cause.

Set boundaries

Boundaries are an important component of family recovery. Boundaries provide us with a sense of individuality and allow us to own our feelings, our experiences and our problems. They also provide a sense of contentment and peace with the self and allow the family to work to not personalize the addict’s problems. To set healthy boundaries, the family must learn to detach with love. Detaching with love does not mean to shutout or isolate the loved one. It means to detach oneself from the disease

Release guilt, shame, blame

Addiction is a disease that feeds on the power of dark and all-consuming emotions. Guilt, shame and blame often draw us inward and leave us unwilling to reach out for the support that is so incredibly important when a family is in recovery. Work to release these emotions as you focus on the positives of the journey ahead.

Find your support system (NAR/AL ANON), ask for help, and rely on these support systems

Again, the way to heal is to make the time to do so. Prioritize yourself and your sanity and seek out support through groups such as NAR/AL ANON family group meetings. For help finding your local group, please call one of the phone numbers listed below:

Al-Anon and Alateen Family Groups

Phone Number: 1-888-4525-2666

Nar-Anon Family Group

Phone Number: 1-800-477-6291

Forgive yourself and focus on today

Unfortunately, you cannot change or undo the past. Move forward with confidence regarding what you can control. Focus on what is directly in front of you. Ask yourself, what do I need to accomplish today to be well?

Recovery is not an event, but instead an ongoing, evergreen process.

Family members can also relapse in a sense. We may relapse into old unhealthy behaviors or ways of thinking. The key to healing is understanding that recovery is not an event, but a process that will always require our attention and the prioritization of our self-care.

Serenity Prayer

Finally, in times of trouble, remember the serenity prayer:

Grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change,

Courage to change the things I can,

And wisdom to know the difference.

***

For more information, resources, and encouragement, “like” the Fellowship Hall Facebook page and follow us on Instagram at @FellowshipHallNC.

 

About Fellowship Hall

For 50 years, Fellowship Hall has been saving lives. We are a 99-bed, private, not-for-profit alcohol and drug treatment center located on 120 tranquil acres in Greensboro, N.C. We provide treatment and evidence-based programs built upon the Twelve-Step model of recovery. We have been accredited by The Joint Commission since 1974 as a specialty hospital and are a member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers. We are committed to providing exceptional, compassionate care to every individual we serve.

June 22, 2022

Recovery is a fresh start through which people aim to find joy and purpose in everyday life without the need for substances. Without substances to turn to and help keep their mind off difficult times in life, people need something else to help ground them and keep them pushing forward, helping and caring for others around them in need. This is where spirituality comes into play. No matter your personal beliefs, spirituality is something every single person is capable of practicing, and doing so is a strong motivator to continue maintaining your sobriety.

 

What’s the difference between spirituality and religion?

  • A common misunderstanding of the 12 Step Program is that it is grounded in religion and focused on serving one God. Most people tend to conflate spirituality with religion, and in doing so, shy away from finding a higher power because they associate it with religious practices that they may or may not be comfortable with. Spirituality and religion are two very different things – you don’t need to be religious at all to find liberation and comfort in spirituality.
  • Religion is made up of rituals and prayers, and each religion has a set of doctrines or beliefs that they adhere to. There may also be specific conditions for membership, as well as an air of righteousness or judgement upon other religious groups or non-religious people. There are specific guidelines for communicating with religious gods.
  • Spirituality, on the other hand, is anything that you personally believe in that gives you freedom and peace of mind. Spirituality is about remaining humble and grateful for life, accepting your powerlessness, and staying connected to a higher power – something bigger than yourself that serves as your driving force for making it through each day and meeting your needs. Your higher power can be whatever you desire – a god of your choosing, or a force of the universe, like nature. Your higher power can even be something as abstract as an idea. How you communicate with your higher power is up to you. There is no ‘right way’ to be spiritual.

Why is spirituality important for recovery?

  • The human spirit is wired for connection. Without that connection, we have an empty void that we must fill. At that point, addiction issues begin to arise, as people lack that spiritual connection with a higher power and can potentially turn to drugs and alcohol to fill the void.
  • Spirituality gives you a sense of identity and purpose. In active addiction, drugs and alcohol made it difficult to understand what your identity and purpose were – substances served to keep your mind off difficult topics like self-acceptance. An addict is living in ‘unreality,’ completely separated from their true thoughts, feelings, and relationships, and dealing with fear and isolation. This is often referred to as the ‘bottom,’ and is where many people become motivated by a need for change to finally reach out to a higher power and make that spiritual connection.
  • Admitting you are powerless to your addiction is Step 1. The humility it takes to come to terms with that is only possible through spirituality. You have to find comfort and motivation in a higher power bigger than yourself, and look to that higher power for guidance, in order to be able to love, care for, and connect with others in your life.
  • Embracing spirituality and finding your higher power opens up your life to spirit-nourishing practices such as meditation, mindfulness, reading, exercise, or anything else that makes you feel good and helps you grow. Spirituality pushes you out of your comfort zone and encourages you to dedicate time and effort towards bettering yourself. When you focus on improving your life and helping those around you, you’re much more likely to remain sober.

***

For more information, resources, and encouragement, “like” the Fellowship Hall Facebook page and follow us on Instagram at @FellowshipHallNC.

 

About Fellowship Hall

For 50 years, Fellowship Hall has been saving lives. We are a 99-bed, private, not-for-profit alcohol and drug treatment center located on 120 tranquil acres in Greensboro, N.C. We provide treatment and evidence-based programs built upon the Twelve-Step model of recovery. We have been accredited by The Joint Commission since 1974 as a specialty hospital and are a member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers. We are committed to providing exceptional, compassionate care to every individual we serve.

June 8, 2022

“[Recovery] changed my life… it was the best thing I ever did. My big worry when I got sober was, ‘I’m not going to have fun anymore.’ Someone gets married and I’m not gonna have a drink? Guess what – I didn’t have any of that, and it’s been awesome.”

Actor, producer, and director Rob Lowe discusses what he enjoys the most about being in recovery after 30 years of sobriety – and offers his best advice to those struggling with addiction, as well as the family members around them.

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For more information, resources, and encouragement, “like” the Fellowship Hall Facebook page and follow us on Instagram at @FellowshipHallNC.

About Fellowship Hall

For 50 years, Fellowship Hall has been saving lives. We are a 99-bed, private, not-for-profit alcohol and drug treatment center located on 120 tranquil acres in Greensboro, N.C. We provide treatment and evidence-based programs built upon the Twelve-Step model of recovery. We have been accredited by The Joint Commission since 1974 as a specialty hospital and are a member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers. We are committed to providing exceptional, compassionate care to every individual we serve.

May 25, 2022

During treatment for substance use disorder (SUD), other issues beyond the main problem of addiction are identified in order to best help the patient succeed in achieving recovery. These issues take form in co-occurring disorders – defined as any mental health disorders that are present at the same time as SUD. This is also known as “dual diagnosis.” Some of the most common co-occurring disorders noted in patients with SUD are:

  • Generalized anxiety disorder
  • Eating disorders
  • Bipolar disorder
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
  • Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)

Symptoms between the two disorders (for example, SUD and anxiety disorder) can interact, negatively influencing the healing process and worsening the prognosis for both disorders.

How many people suffer from co-occurring disorders?

Co-occurring disorders are far more common than you may think. According to a 2015 study by the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), approximately 8.1 million adults in the U.S. have co-occurring disorders. This constitutes more than 40% of those with substance use disorder.

Where do co-occurring disorders come from?

Generally, there are a few known factors that contribute to co-occurring disorders arising and persisting:

  • Developmental factors: The way you are brought up during your childhood and adolescence, periods of extreme importance in terms of brain development, can have a direct impact on the development of both SUD and mental health disorders. Substance use during an early stage of life can affect the brain and increase risk for developing mental health disorders.
  • Environmental factors: Life events that happen around you in your immediate environment, such as trauma, stress, standard of living, and more, can increase the risk and likelihood of both SUD and mental health disorders.
  • Genetic factors: Just as addiction can be passed down as a genetic trait, so too can traits that lead to mental health disorders such as anxiety, schizophrenia, or bipolar disorder.

How can we best treat co-occurring disorders while managing SUD?

The best plan of action for tackling co-occurring disorders begins with simply understanding their importance. Often, too much emphasis is placed on one area, whether it be SUD or mental health disorders, rather than taking an approach that encompasses the best practices of care for both. One cannot be managed successfully while the other persists.

In the treatment of SUD, many facilities, including Fellowship Hall, dedicate time during the treatment process to mental health disorders that can be exacerbating the patient’s SUD.

With May being Mental Health Awareness Month, it’s a good time to check in with your loved ones suffering from substance use disorder and offer to be a source of support and encouragement in discussing mental health issues. Open discussion and understanding of different mental health disorders can be the key to an accurate co-occurring disorder diagnosis which leads to a more well-rounded and successful recovery plan.

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For more information, resources, and encouragement, “like” the Fellowship Hall Facebook page and follow us on Instagram at @FellowshipHallNC.

 

About Fellowship Hall

For 50 years, Fellowship Hall has been saving lives. We are a 99-bed, private, not-for-profit alcohol and drug treatment center located on 120 tranquil acres in Greensboro, N.C. We provide treatment and evidence-based programs built upon the Twelve-Step model of recovery. We have been accredited by The Joint Commission since 1974 as a specialty hospital and are a member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers. We are committed to providing exceptional, compassionate care to every individual we serve.

 

May 11, 2022

Avoiding Complacency

 

Whenever we accomplish something, we naturally feel excited and proud of ourselves. After leaving treatment, those in recovery are especially proud – they have just dedicated time and effort towards self-improvement and making lifestyle changes. However, recovery is not a “one and done” achievement – it is something to constantly work towards, which is why addiction is known as a chronic disease.

When first leaving treatment and during the early recovery period, people feel empowered and strong in their recovery, happy about all they have accomplished. They may feel they are at a point where they can take a break and remove recovery from the top of their mind. This leads to complacency. Complacency is defined as “self-satisfaction, especially when accompanied by unawareness of actual dangers or deficiencies.” Here are a few common reasons why people become complacent in their recovery – along with strategies on how to avoid complacency and focus on long-term recovery.

  • Don’t ride the pink cloud – Most people in recovery have heard of, or experienced, the “pink cloud” – a period within early recovery where a person feels euphoric, proud, and excited. There’s nothing wrong with being positive and optimistic after achieving a goal, but the pink cloud can take over and make you avoid facing the reality of long-term recovery as you “float” above the world, forgetting about real challenges in recovery like navigating work, relationships, and aftercare. Use your early recovery period to build a plan for tackling these long-term issues instead of riding the pink cloud, and you’ll already be a step ahead.
  • Don’t lose sight of the bigger picture – Early recovery is important, but it is only part of the journey. Focusing too heavily on early recovery can cause you to lose sight of your end goal, which is maintaining recovery over a long period of time and incorporating recovery into your everyday life.
  • Keep up with the program – After 90 meetings in 90 days, you may feel like it’s time to relax. Many people return to use after 90 days because they feel like they have their addiction under control by that point. Attending meetings and keeping in touch with your sponsor are crucial to successful recovery. Without that constant support and reinforcement, it’s easy to trail off into relapse.
    • Continue to be of service to those in your recovery network as well as your community. Giving back is a main tenet of the 12 Step Program because it allows you to feel good about yourself and help those around you, all while keeping recovery a priority. Again, keep long-term goals in mind, like becoming a volunteer or program speaker after a year of sobriety.

It is all too easy to fall into the trap of complacency once you have exited the early recovery period. As long as you continue to make recovery a priority, and stay connected with those in your support network – as you did while you were in treatment and early recovery – your chance of sustaining successful, long-term recovery greatly increases.

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For more information, resources, and encouragement, “like” the Fellowship Hall Facebook page and follow us on Instagram at @FellowshipHallNC.

 

About Fellowship Hall

For 50 years, Fellowship Hall has been saving lives. We are a 99-bed, private, not-for-profit alcohol and drug treatment center located on 120 tranquil acres in Greensboro, N.C. We provide treatment and evidence-based programs built upon the Twelve-Step model of recovery. We have been accredited by The Joint Commission since 1974 as a specialty hospital and are a member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers. We are committed to providing exceptional, compassionate care to every individual we serve.

April 27, 2022

When you’re in recovery, your old methods of relieving stress – having a drink or using a drug – can no longer be utilized. It’s time to build new, healthier habits that allow you to relax and enjoy yourself while also improving your lifestyle and setting yourself up for future success in your recovery. Below are some tips for healthy stress relief that may seem like common sense, but are oven overlooked and undervalued.

  • Do physical activities you actually enjoy. Fitness journeys look different for everyone – but most people will agree that exercise is a great stress reliever. That doesn’t mean you have to go overboard on the treadmill or lift weights at the crack of dawn. Find a routine that works for you, and you’ll be much more likely to stick with it and genuinely enjoy it. When you’re engaged in physical activity, your brain releases endorphins that make you happier. Exercises done daily such as yoga, aerobics, and even simply walking can go a long way towards making you feel better about yourself and your life.
  • Maintain a healthy diet. Along with a good exercise regimen, a healthy change in diet will help prevent negative feelings and regret that accompany a junk-food binge. Again, this doesn’t mean you have to go overboard – take small steps to create a greater lifestyle change that you’re more likely to keep up with. When you eat healthier, your mood improves
  • Build better sleep habits. “Eight hours a night” isn’t just something your parents made up – science shows that we are more productive, have better memory, and are overall happier when we fit enough sleep into our schedule. Running on less sleep leaves us ill-equipped to handle life’s challenges, which inevitably leads to a buildup of stress.
  • Talk it out. Opening up certainly isn’t an easy task, especially for those in recovery who are used to isolating and self-medicating rather than speaking their mind when they’re struggling. In treatment, you discover how important and necessary talking about your feelings can be – don’t lose that ability once you’re in the real world. Continue having discussions with your loved ones and your recovery support network. Don’t keep anything bottled up. Your stress levels will drastically decrease as you get things off your chest and receive verbal support and feedback from those around you.

Remember that being kind to your body, no matter which way you go about it, is the best way to relieve yourself of stress, whether internal or external. When you practice healthy ways of coping with stress, you’re reinforcing those behaviors in ways that make you more likely to keep up with them, though they may seem difficult or tedious at first. As in recovery, stress relief is a constant battle that must be taken seriously and dealt with in healthy ways.

For more information, resources, and encouragement, “like” the Fellowship Hall Facebook page and follow us on Instagram at @FellowshipHallNC.

About Fellowship Hall

For 50 years, Fellowship Hall has been saving lives. We are a 99-bed, private, not-for-profit alcohol and drug treatment center located on 120 tranquil acres in Greensboro, N.C. We provide treatment and evidence-based programs built upon the Twelve-Step model of recovery. We have been accredited by The Joint Commission since 1974 as a specialty hospital and are a member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers. We are committed to providing exceptional, compassionate care to every individual we serve.

 

April 25, 2022

Fellowship Hall, a 96-bed private, not-for-profit specialty hospital offering abstinence-based alcohol and drug treatment based on the 12-Step Model of Recovery, located on a serene 120-acre country setting in Greensboro, NC, is currently seeking a Part-time Evening Front Desk Receptionist to work Monday-Friday, 4p-8p. Fellowship Hall has been established for 45 years and enjoys a stellar reputation as one of the premier treatment providers in the country. Our facility has been accredited by Joint Commission since 1974, and we offer inpatient care, detoxification, partial hospital, intensive outpatient, family programming, extended treatment, and structured living. We draw our guests from North and South Carolina, Virginia, and 23 other States.

The Evening Front Desk Receptionist position is responsible for three primary areas:

• Reception activities including but not limited to: answering all incoming calls to the facility, registering all visitors and providing services to the guests such as making change, selling stamps, accessing the safe, etc.
• Assist the Admissions team with new admissions from arrival until they are admitted.
• General office work, including scanning of documents, insurance cards and IDs, creating door tags, tracking packages,
• Assist with COVID screenings and temperature checks for all staff and visitors arriving to campus during shift.
• Order supplies and manage inventory of supplies. Coordinate distribution of special request supplies.
• Supporting Accounts Payable duties by managing invoice approvals, entering invoices for payment, paying invoices, and managing any questions or concerns from vendors.
• Providing support to the Outreach Department by manning the online chat system during the evening hours

Minimum Education: High School Diploma

Minimum Experience: 3 Years as receptionist or customer service-related work

Preferred Education: Workshops and inservices in substance abuse

Skills: Telephone communication proficiency
Good interpersonal relationship skills
Computer skills, proficient in Excel and WORD
Good organizational skills, Ability to multi-task
Exceptional customer service skills, internal and external
High degree of professionalism
Independently self-productive
Teamwork and Collaboration skills

April 13, 2022

Many people have others in their lives that struggle with alcohol addiction – or struggle with addiction themselves. However, because of the stigma around addiction, help is often not received as those with addiction problems keep their struggles bottled up inside. They fear societal repercussions of admitting their problem and seeking help. They may not even know who they can confide in, or where they should begin looking for help.

Alcohol Awareness Month, established by the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence (NCADD), takes place every April with the goal of educating people about the dangers of alcohol abuse and reducing the stigma surrounding addiction and recovery, so that those most in need of help feel comfortable asking for it. If your loved one is struggling with alcohol abuse, or if you yourself have been struggling, Alcohol Awareness Month urges you to seek help, start important conversations, and be a support system for those around you who might be struggling.

If you find yourself asking “How can I participate in Alcohol Awareness Month?”, use these suggestions to get an idea of what the month is all about.

Have difficult conversations with loved ones who might be struggling with addiction.

If you’ve noticed that a loved one is relying on heavy drinking to cope with stress, sit them down and talk it out in a low-pressure, relaxed environment. Let them know you’re there for them without judgement or accusation. Offer to help them find treatment or Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) meetings in their area. Be a steady, unwavering support system for your loved one when they need it most. This could be the conversation your loved one needs to serve as a catalyst for seeking help and treatment. Or, they may continue feeling like they’re not ready to get help. Persist in communicating with your loved one in a firm yet loving way, helping guide them to the right decision.

For a comprehensive list of nearby AA meetings by state and city, visit the official site at https://alcoholicsanonymous.com/

Change attitudes.

You might have certain preconceived notions related to alcohol use and those who suffer from addiction. Actively work to change these stereotypes and redirect your thinking in a more positive, helpful way.

There are countless books, essays, and online articles revolving around the subject of alcohol abuse and addiction. Put in the effort to help your loved one succeed and begin doing your own research – maybe even begin attending Al-Anon support groups, which are similar to AA meetings but held specifically for family members and loved ones close to those suffering from addiction.

For a comprehensive list of nearby Al-Anon meetings by state and city, visit https://findrecovery.com/alanon_meetings/

Work to change attitudes of those around you as well. For example, sit down with younger kids and talk openly about alcohol use in the hopes of changing their own attitudes and continuing to erase stigma. Discuss healthy coping mechanisms with them and emphasize that negative feelings and situations cannot be erased with alcohol use.

Throw a clean party!

Those dealing with alcohol addiction often feel pressured to drink in party settings with their peers, who may or may not also suffer from addiction. They might feel like it is impossible to have fun or be social without alcohol. As a support system to a loved one suffering from addiction, give them an opportunity to see how enjoyable an alcohol-free lifestyle can be. Host a gathering where drinking alcohol is explicitly prohibited. Serve other drinks like mocktails, club sodas, root beers, and any other fun concoctions.

Since beginning in 1987, Alcohol Awareness Month has made a concerted effort to save countless lives nationwide from alcohol-related deaths by making people more aware of alcohol abuse and encouraging them to spread the word and help others. Take the message of Alcohol Awareness Month and apply it throughout the entire year – be a light for others in need and spread hope!

 

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For more information, resources, and encouragement, “like” the Fellowship Hall Facebook page and follow us on Instagram at @FellowshipHallNC.

 

About Fellowship Hall

For 50 years, Fellowship Hall has been saving lives. We are a 99-bed, private, not-for-profit alcohol and drug treatment center located on 120 tranquil acres in Greensboro, N.C. We provide treatment and evidence-based programs built upon the Twelve-Step model of recovery. We have been accredited by The Joint Commission since 1974 as a specialty hospital and are a member of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers. We are committed to providing exceptional, compassionate care to every individual we serve.

 

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